The Ultimate Gipf Board



The Ultimate GIPF Board.

Kris Burm's GIPF series (http://www.gipf.com/) is a masterwork of abstract strategy design. Here you will find a board designed to play nearly all the games in the series.  It works with dvonn, gipf, tzaar, yinsh, lyngk, and zertz (although zertz doesn't really need a board, so this is cheating a bit). The pieces for punct are a bit too unusual so it doesn't work with that one.

Patrons get access to jpeg and tiff files of the board so they can print their own. They also get to make suggestions for new boards and design ideas. The patreon is pay whatever you can afford:

There are currently 2 versions of the board:

Cloth Board: https://www.printerstudio.com/sell/designs/ultimate-gipf-board-cloth.html

It is 22 by 22 inches wide and has the same 46.4 mm spacing between the pieces as the Yinsh board. The cloth is about 0.25 mm thick making it very compact.




Neoprene Rubber Mat Board: https://www.printerstudio.com/sell/designs/ultimate-gipf-board-rubber-mat.html

This mat is 18 by 18 inches with a spacing of 41.4 mm between the center of the pieces. The printed board is about 1.5 mm thick.




The Ultimate Gipf board design:
 
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ZJgxt3ilt1HIg3C0h2tPguqkmU_37bA1/view?usp=sharing
v.8


Design Notes: 
The big challenge when designing this board was to make the boundaries of each board distinct enough to identify when playing a specific game, but not too distracting when playing the others. One of the beautiful things about many of Kris Burm's game designs is that the pieces themselves determine the movement possibilities such that as pieces are moved the number of possible future moves decrease. This means that the games are always moving towards a conclusion. As far as designing a board that encompasses many of his games, this means that it is only necessary to design something that helps designate the starting spaces for setup (as well as still helping to indicate the number of empty spaces between pieces as a game progresses). The pieces themselves from that point on can help differentiate one game board from another.

The Gipf board:

Highlighted Gipf Board. 
Pieces are placed on the large dots and then slide inward.

Pictured here using Tzaar pieces.

The DVONN board:

Highlighted Dvonn board.
The large dotted circles indicate the placement for the DVONN pieces.


Shown using the normal Dvonn pieces.

Shown using Tzaar and Lyngk pieces.

The TZAAR board:
Highlighted Tzaar board.
The TZAAR board is indicated by the light blue hexagon and the larger dots . As the center space is not played on during the game it is surrounded by a darker grey color to distinguish it from other spaces.


The Yinsh board:
Highlighted Yinsh board.
Yinsh is played on all of the dots. The only locations not playable in Yinsh are the two most lateral dotted circles (used for Dvonn). There are also three circular indications on each player's side of the board to place scoring rings.


The Lyngk board:
Highlighted Lyngk board.
The Lyngk board is designated by the darker star shape in the center of the board.

 



Version changes:
Version 8 - Tweaked colors slightly

Version 7 - Added Lyngk Board

Matthew T. Ross - Last Updated: August 25th 2020